Archive for the ‘Arfaz Ali’ Category

Week 4

April 6, 2012

The week I worked on the Kirk Johnson Building. This building was constructed in 1912 as the house for Kirk Johnson Music story. The façade is beautifully constructed in the beaux- arts style using exquisite materials. There are white tile columns that sit upon cut- stone. There is a mansard roof that is finished with copper- clad.

drawing of the storefront

Bottom: The storefront of this building features some beautiful glasswork. The glass panel on the top of the storefront has a repeating pattern. The glass windows are also designed to reflect a repeating pattern. Above the storefront are wave engravings, a beaux- arts staple. And finally, there is the original “Kirk Johnson & Co” signage.

middle section of the building

Middle: The middle section has a very light and airy look, due to the 3 story glass windows that cover most of it. On the sides of these windows are white tile columns. The windows feature a metal pattern design.

beaux-arts designs on the roof

Roof: The roof of this building is completely done in the beaux- arts style. There are copious amounts of ceramic decorations. There are two cartouches surrounded by classic designs. There are also many repeating geometric designs. The copper- clad mansard roof is a reflection of the French Revival style that was also incorporated in the buildings design.

elevation drawing

Week 3

March 30, 2012

For this week I worked on the Hager Building. This five-story building was also done in the beaux- arts style. An example of this is the ceramic ornaments that decorate the façade of this building. A more detailed writing/ analysis will be posted soon, also with my works for next weeks building: Reily Raub and Bros.

 

a detailed view of the middle of the building, showing the beaux- arts elements of repeating patterns and ceramic ornaments


week 2

March 23, 2012

This week I read through some of my books from the library, and did research on Urban’s shift to beaux-arts. After this week I am more aware of the work and time that needs to be put into my project. For next week I will have completed the drawings and analysis for another Urban building.

This week I focused on The Griest Building. Built in 1924, the Griest Building or Lancaster Federal Building is Lancaster’s only skyscraper. In terms of the beaux-arts features, this building can be divided into three different parts: bottom, middle, and top. Each part has it’s own utilities and venustas.

Top:

The top of the building served as a theatre room and auditorium. There are classical Greek Corinthian columns lined neatly along the top of the building. The windows are topped with an arch. There is a geometric pattern on top of the Corinthian columns, another beaux-arts feature. There are also clay birds on the corners of the roof. It is common to have clay sculptures of people and animals on beaux-arts buildings. The roof is painted with green and gold fresco, adding the final touch of venustas to this building.

drawing of the top part of the Griest building (not to scale)

Middle:

The middle part of the building serves as office spacing and has a venustas to match. There are neat and orderly windows along the façade, with nothing else of much beaux-arts interest.

Bottom:

The bottom of the building serves as the main lobby, and a commercial front. There are many beaux- arts features on this building. Firstly, there are classical Greek Corinthian columns lined neatly along the façade. In between these columns are arched glass store fronts, another example of beaux-arts decorations. The bottom level is also constructed using a different material than the middle or top, this being limestone. This adds much beauty to this buildings ground level. The difference in materials is another example of the reoccurring beaux-arts style.

drawing of the bottom part of the Griest building (not to scale)

Elevation drawing for The Griest Building (not to scale):

Research Proposal

March 2, 2012

For my final project I will research and investigate the classical elements that C Emlen Urban used in his architecture. I will also examine how an Urban building’s utilitas is reflected in it’s venustas. After analyzing the sources I gather, I will create an elevation drawing for each building. These drawings will be paired with writing analysis of each buildings utilitas and venustas, however most of the focus will be on the classical decorations of each building. My goal for this project is to create a book that explains why and how Urban used classical decoration to reflect a buildings utilitas. This book will consist of all my elevation drawings and their corresponding writings, along with a final research paper that summarizes my findings.

My primary sources will be pictures I can find of C Emlen Urban’s buildings collected from the Lancaster Historical Society and Preservation Trust. I have not yet collected these primary sources, so I cannot itemize them at this point. My secondary sources are books from the Shadek- Fackenthall library. These secondary sources will provide me with more knowledge about classical architecture, especially the decorative elements. The secondary sources are as follows:

  • Curl, James Stevens. Classical Architecture: An Introduction to Its Vocabulary and Essentials, with a Select Glossary of Terms. New York: Norton, 2003. Print.
  • Gromort, Georges. The Elements of Classical Architecture. New York: W.W. Norton, 2001. Print.
  • Hersey, George L. The Lost Meaning of Classical Architecture: Speculations on Ornament from Vitruvius to Venturi. Cambridge, MA: MIT, 1988. Print.
  • Porphyrios, Demetri. Classical Architecture: The Living Tradition. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1992. Print.
  • Senseney, John R. The Art of Building in the Classical World: Vision, Craftsmanship, and Linear Perspective in Greek and Roman Architecture. New York: Cambridge UP, 2011. Print

I plan to investigate the relationship between the venustas and utilitas of various C Emlen Urban buildings of historic significance. I predict that I will find a strong relationship between a buildings functions and it’s classical decorations. Based on the trip to the Lancaster Preservation Trust I was able to see an obvious connection between that building’s functions and the decorations implement by C Emlen Urban. I plan on finding pictures of more Urban buildings, with different functions, and exposing their functional-decorative correlation as well. These pictures will be my primary sources. With the used of my list of books (secondary sources) I will investigate and examine the classical decorations of each building. After finding these relationships I will explain my research and create a write-up and elevation drawing for each building.

Week 7: I will go to the Lancaster Historical Society and Lancaster Preservation Trust and hunt for photos of C Emlem Ubran buildings. After finding these photos I will pick which buildings I want to do a further analysis of and create a list of buildings. Also, I will go to the library and check out all my books.

Week 8: I will read any books needed to further my understanding of classical architecture, specifically the decorative elements. Also I will create an elevation drawing and write-up for the first building and post this on the blog.

Week 9: I will create an elevation drawing and write-up for the second and third buildings and post this on the blog.

Week 10: I will create an elevation drawing and write-up for the fourth and fifth and post this on the blog.

Week 11: I will make the “book” containing all drawings, and writings. I will also write a final research paper that summarizes my project, findings, and conclusions.

Reilly Bros & Raub

February 17, 2012

Utilitas:

Reilly Bros & Raub is now the Central Market Mall. As a mall, this building houses many small businesses in one place.  In order to achieve this, the building follows a divisive plan, as there are many stores within the rectangular parameter of the building. The primary spaces of this building are various rooms, which serve as storefronts for businesses. The secondary spaces the hallways connecting these rooms and bathrooms. This building design is ideal for any type of commercial business, and in fact the utilitas has always been to serve as a store. The open spaces provide copious room for a store to display its products.

Firmitas:

The building is noticeably symmetrical, thus the building was constructed symmetrically. The usage of symmetry is common to a classically designed building such as this one.  The structural system of this 4-story building is trabeated. The building’s steel frame is arranged in a typical trabeated system of posts and lintels. The façade is constructed using granite and Indiana limestone, along with a two-story glass window/wall. The roof is made of cooper, the green color today due to oxidation. There is a metal signage on the ground level reading: Reilly Bros & Raub. This signage is the original used by the Reilly Bros for their hardware store.

Venustas:

One of this buildings most unique and beautiful features is the two-story window wall. This window is an example of a solid-void. The divisive plan of this building creates a balanced three-dimensional solid. This building is formal because of its symmetry and entrance, which is located in the center of the façade. The extensive usage of floor-sized glass windows gives the building a light airy look. The roof of this building is flat. But, there is an elaborately designed copper cap on the roof, which adds volumes of beauty to the building. The ground level façade is made of glass surrounded by Indiana limestone. This causes the building to standout from its neighbors. There are two decorative columns on the rights and left side of the façade. These only add to the classical beauty of this building.

Brother John Dorwart: 1816- 1877

February 3, 2012

This tombstone belongs to members of the Dorwart family. The Dorwart’s are a big family, all born and raised in Lancaster. One of the names of the tombstone reads “Brother John Dorwart”.  John Dorwart was born on September 10, 1816 in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. He died on December 7, 1882 in Lancaster. This tombstone also belongs to other members of the Dorwart family, including Mother Dorwart, Isabel Dorwart, and Margret Dorwart. We were unable to decipher the dates due to the condition of the tombstone. After more research I found another member of the Dorwart family, Charles Dorwart. Charles Dorwart was a member of the US Marine Corps. There was a lot of mystery around his death. His family and much of the Lancaster community were not certain of when or how he died, due to a military accident.

3-D model of Dorwart Tombstone

Sources:

http://www.spanamwar.com/dorwart.htm

http://records.ancestry.com/Johannes_Dorwart_records.ashx?pid=73677407

http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Dorwart-6

West King Street

February 3, 2012

3-D model of 1929 West King Street

West King Street (56-26):

Note: The addresses today do not match those of the 1929 map. The addresses have changed, but the buildings remain.

56, 54:

  • 1886: These two addresses share a building on the corner of West King and South Prince Street.
  • 1891: The building remains unchanged from 1886.
  • 1912: The building remains unchanged from 1891.
  • 1929: The building remains unchanged from 1912. However, from 1929 map it is revealed that this building was 3-story apartment building. Given this building has remained unchanged, it can be concluded that this building served as an apartment building since 1886. We also see that this building was a tile face building
  • 2012: This building is still 3-stories. 56 W King is an apartment complex, and 54 W King is now Champ’s Barber School.

This building is very plain, and well gray. There are decorative patterns on the ground level, however the usage of dull colors does not help the building stand out. Overall the building is very symmetrical, but the building is still lacking. Aesthetically the building is a bit boring.

________________________________________________________________________

  • 1886: This building is separated from building 56-54 by a small alley. The function of this building cannot be determined from the maps.
  • 1891: The building is shortened length wise, as the back of the building is removed.
  • 1912: The building remains unchanged from 1891.
  • 1929: The building is a 4-story tile faced building, serving as an apartment building.  It is also connected to building 50, also an apartment building. The previously removed structure is re-added.
  • 2012: The addresses since 1941 have changed. 56, 54 and 52 W King Street all share the same building now. This building is not is now Rick’s Place, a local lounge.

This building is much more aesthetically pleasing. There are obvious classical features, which are augmented by the buildings formal design. The windows arch designs are all purely decorative, only present to add beauty. The bright red brick used on the façade makes the building pop out of the street.

________________________________________________________________________

50:

  • 1886: This building is attached to building 52. The function of this building cannot be determined from the maps.
  • 1891: The building remains unchanged from 1886.
  • 1912: The building remains unchanged from 1891.
  • 1929: This 4-story tile-faced building remains unchanged and serves as an apartment building.
  • 2012: This building is no longer shared by two addresses, and is now home to only 50 W King Street. The building is now 4-story and stone-faced. Rick’s Deli is on street level, with apartments on the higher floors.

This buildings most interesting feature is the ground store awning. The awning is made of some tile, or ceramic and has an almost Asian style. The rest of the building is classically classical. The windows are all arranged neatly, following the building’s symmetrical theme. The roof is decorated with an exquisite design, undoubtedly inspired by Classical Greek architecture.

________________________________________________________________________

48, 46:

  • 1886: These addresses share a building.
  • 1891: The building remains unchanged from 1886.
  • 1912: The building remains unchanged from 1891.
  • 1929: This 3-story building served as Staty Printing.
  • 2012: The building is now made of stone, yet still remains 4-stories. The building is now Dreams Collide Studio.

The ground level of this store is has a simply, yet pleasing design. The material is most likely painted brick. The windows all share the same cap design. The unique red hue of the brick used to construct this building adds much beauty. The red brick clashes with the yellow design of the floor level, creating catchy attraction for passing by consumers. The dormer windows add an older classic feeling to the building.

________________________________________________________________________

44, 42:

  • 1886: These addresses share a building.
  • 1891: A portion of the back of the building is removed.
  • 1912: The building remains unchanged from 1891.
  • 1928: The building is extended length-wise, adding to the formally shortened back. The back of the building is a warehouse, the front apartments.
  • 2012: This building is still 4-stories, but is now made of stone. The building seems to be some sort of art gallery.

This building is perhaps the most beautiful on the street. The glass windows on the storefront are the start of this stores beauty. The widows are arranged symmetrically, adding to this buildings formal outline. Also, the window’s green arches add vibrancy to the building. The clock in the middle of the façade is both beautiful and functional. Naturally, people passing by will glace at the clock, only to be captured by the buildings beauty.

________________________________________________________________________

40, 38, 36:

  •  1886: These addresses share a building.
  • 1891: The building remains unchanged from 1886.
  • 1912: A portion of the back right of the building is removed.
  • 1928: The building is extended in the back. This building is a 4 story Lodge.
  • 2012: This building is still 4-stories, but is now made of stone. The building is now home to many stores

34:

  • 1886:
  • 1891: The building remains unchanged from 1886.
  • 1912: The building remains unchanged from 1891.
  • 1928: The building remains unchanged. This building is a 3-story tile-face apartment building.
  • 2012: The building, still 3-stories, is now made of bricks. Eden’s collectables occupy the street level.

This building is very nicely composed. The formal and symmetrical design, along with the general small shape of this building makes it very compact. The windows are beautifully enhanced by green highlights and classic designs. These green highlights in the windows are further amplified by the green roof and storefront.

________________________________________________________________________

32, 30:

  • 1886:
  • 1891: The building remains unchanged from 1886.
  • 1912: The building remains unchanged from 1891.
  • 1928: The building remains unchanged. This building is a 3-story tile-face Sporting Goods store.
  • 2012: The building is now a 4-story brick faced structure. A bank occupies the street level, with apartments on top.

This buildings storefront has a very light feeling. This is caused by the combination of the light airy off-white color and glass windows. The green designs on the storefront stand out against this off-white color.  The red bricks are bright, especially in contract to the green design of the windows. Finally the building is finished perfectly with the addition of a green copper roof.

________________________________________________________________________

28, 26:

  • 1886:
  • 1891: The building remains unchanged from 1886.
  • 1912: The building remains unchanged from 1891.
  • 1928: The building remains unchanged. This building, 3-stories, is home to Steinman’s Hardware
  • 2012: The building remains 3-stories, and is amazingly still Steinman’s Hardware.

By far my favorite, this building, Steinman’s Hardware is possibly the most aesthetically beautiful on the street. The storefront is made of marble and huge glass windows. This adds a more polished and affluent theme to this building. The red bricks used to make this façade are a vibrant red color. The windows, and their green design are classically beautiful. Finally the arches on the roof add a new level of venutas.