West King Street

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3-D model of 1929 West King Street

West King Street (56-26):

Note: The addresses today do not match those of the 1929 map. The addresses have changed, but the buildings remain.

56, 54:

  • 1886: These two addresses share a building on the corner of West King and South Prince Street.
  • 1891: The building remains unchanged from 1886.
  • 1912: The building remains unchanged from 1891.
  • 1929: The building remains unchanged from 1912. However, from 1929 map it is revealed that this building was 3-story apartment building. Given this building has remained unchanged, it can be concluded that this building served as an apartment building since 1886. We also see that this building was a tile face building
  • 2012: This building is still 3-stories. 56 W King is an apartment complex, and 54 W King is now Champ’s Barber School.

This building is very plain, and well gray. There are decorative patterns on the ground level, however the usage of dull colors does not help the building stand out. Overall the building is very symmetrical, but the building is still lacking. Aesthetically the building is a bit boring.

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  • 1886: This building is separated from building 56-54 by a small alley. The function of this building cannot be determined from the maps.
  • 1891: The building is shortened length wise, as the back of the building is removed.
  • 1912: The building remains unchanged from 1891.
  • 1929: The building is a 4-story tile faced building, serving as an apartment building.  It is also connected to building 50, also an apartment building. The previously removed structure is re-added.
  • 2012: The addresses since 1941 have changed. 56, 54 and 52 W King Street all share the same building now. This building is not is now Rick’s Place, a local lounge.

This building is much more aesthetically pleasing. There are obvious classical features, which are augmented by the buildings formal design. The windows arch designs are all purely decorative, only present to add beauty. The bright red brick used on the façade makes the building pop out of the street.

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50:

  • 1886: This building is attached to building 52. The function of this building cannot be determined from the maps.
  • 1891: The building remains unchanged from 1886.
  • 1912: The building remains unchanged from 1891.
  • 1929: This 4-story tile-faced building remains unchanged and serves as an apartment building.
  • 2012: This building is no longer shared by two addresses, and is now home to only 50 W King Street. The building is now 4-story and stone-faced. Rick’s Deli is on street level, with apartments on the higher floors.

This buildings most interesting feature is the ground store awning. The awning is made of some tile, or ceramic and has an almost Asian style. The rest of the building is classically classical. The windows are all arranged neatly, following the building’s symmetrical theme. The roof is decorated with an exquisite design, undoubtedly inspired by Classical Greek architecture.

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48, 46:

  • 1886: These addresses share a building.
  • 1891: The building remains unchanged from 1886.
  • 1912: The building remains unchanged from 1891.
  • 1929: This 3-story building served as Staty Printing.
  • 2012: The building is now made of stone, yet still remains 4-stories. The building is now Dreams Collide Studio.

The ground level of this store is has a simply, yet pleasing design. The material is most likely painted brick. The windows all share the same cap design. The unique red hue of the brick used to construct this building adds much beauty. The red brick clashes with the yellow design of the floor level, creating catchy attraction for passing by consumers. The dormer windows add an older classic feeling to the building.

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44, 42:

  • 1886: These addresses share a building.
  • 1891: A portion of the back of the building is removed.
  • 1912: The building remains unchanged from 1891.
  • 1928: The building is extended length-wise, adding to the formally shortened back. The back of the building is a warehouse, the front apartments.
  • 2012: This building is still 4-stories, but is now made of stone. The building seems to be some sort of art gallery.

This building is perhaps the most beautiful on the street. The glass windows on the storefront are the start of this stores beauty. The widows are arranged symmetrically, adding to this buildings formal outline. Also, the window’s green arches add vibrancy to the building. The clock in the middle of the façade is both beautiful and functional. Naturally, people passing by will glace at the clock, only to be captured by the buildings beauty.

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40, 38, 36:

  •  1886: These addresses share a building.
  • 1891: The building remains unchanged from 1886.
  • 1912: A portion of the back right of the building is removed.
  • 1928: The building is extended in the back. This building is a 4 story Lodge.
  • 2012: This building is still 4-stories, but is now made of stone. The building is now home to many stores

34:

  • 1886:
  • 1891: The building remains unchanged from 1886.
  • 1912: The building remains unchanged from 1891.
  • 1928: The building remains unchanged. This building is a 3-story tile-face apartment building.
  • 2012: The building, still 3-stories, is now made of bricks. Eden’s collectables occupy the street level.

This building is very nicely composed. The formal and symmetrical design, along with the general small shape of this building makes it very compact. The windows are beautifully enhanced by green highlights and classic designs. These green highlights in the windows are further amplified by the green roof and storefront.

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32, 30:

  • 1886:
  • 1891: The building remains unchanged from 1886.
  • 1912: The building remains unchanged from 1891.
  • 1928: The building remains unchanged. This building is a 3-story tile-face Sporting Goods store.
  • 2012: The building is now a 4-story brick faced structure. A bank occupies the street level, with apartments on top.

This buildings storefront has a very light feeling. This is caused by the combination of the light airy off-white color and glass windows. The green designs on the storefront stand out against this off-white color.  The red bricks are bright, especially in contract to the green design of the windows. Finally the building is finished perfectly with the addition of a green copper roof.

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28, 26:

  • 1886:
  • 1891: The building remains unchanged from 1886.
  • 1912: The building remains unchanged from 1891.
  • 1928: The building remains unchanged. This building, 3-stories, is home to Steinman’s Hardware
  • 2012: The building remains 3-stories, and is amazingly still Steinman’s Hardware.

By far my favorite, this building, Steinman’s Hardware is possibly the most aesthetically beautiful on the street. The storefront is made of marble and huge glass windows. This adds a more polished and affluent theme to this building. The red bricks used to make this façade are a vibrant red color. The windows, and their green design are classically beautiful. Finally the arches on the roof add a new level of venutas.

 

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